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2022

SFDR Asset

Reference Guide

Contents

Disclaimer: 2022 SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment Reference Guide

The 2022 SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment Reference Guide (“Reference Guide”) accompanies the 2022 SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment and is published both as a standalone document and in the GRESB Portal alongside each Assessment indicator. The Reference Guide reflects the opinions of GRESB and not of the European Union. The information in the Reference Guide has been provided in good faith and is provided on an “as is” basis. We take reasonable care to check the accuracy and completeness of the Reference Guide prior to its publication. While we do not anticipate major changes, we reserve the right to make modifications to the Reference Guide. We will publicly announce any such modifications.

The Reference Guide is not provided as the basis for any professional advice or for transactional use. GRESB and its advisors, consultants and sub‑contractors shall not be responsible or liable for any advice given to third parties, any investment decisions or trading or any other actions taken by you or by third parties based on information contained in the Reference Guide.

Except where stated otherwise, GRESB is the exclusive owner of all intellectual property rights in all the information contained in the Reference Guide.

The SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment

About GRESB

Mission-driven and investor-led, GRESB is the environmental, social and governance (ESG) benchmark for real assets. We work in collaboration with the industry to provide standardized and validated ESG data to the capital markets. The 2021 Real Estate benchmark covered more than 1,500 property companies, real estate investment trusts (REITs), funds, and developers. Our coverage for Infrastructure is more than 700 infrastructure funds and assets. Combined, GRESB represents USD 6.4 trillion AUM. More than 140 institutional investors, with over USD 47 trillion AUM, use GRESB data to monitor their investments, engage with their managers, and make decisions that lead to a more sustainable real asset industry.

For more information, visit gresb.com. Follow GRESB on LinkedIn or @GRESB on Twitter.

About SFDR (EU Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation)

The EU’s Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (SFDR) is a new transparency requirement for financial market participants related to key environmental, social and governance (ESG) criteria. The purpose is to increase market transparency and direct capital towards more sustainable businesses.

SFDR imposes different disclosure obligations on Financial Market Participants, depending on their size and the nature of their products. All participants in the EU will need to make general disclosures about sustainability practices for both the entity and their products.

They will also need to report on their Principle Adverse Impacts (PAIs), which are a series of indicators covering a range of ESG issues, such as greenhouse gas emissions and waste management.

At the moment, most companies and funds do not provide disclosures or collect data that is granular enough to satisfy the requirement, once it goes fully in effect, or to provide investors with the level of transparency that is expected by this regulation.

For many, the main challenge of the regulation will revolve around the need to first collect this data and then report on detailed product and entity level ESG characteristics starting in 2023.

When approaching this data collection-and-reporting challenge starting next year, it is important for Financial Market Participants to consider that the data they report will serve as a basis for year-over-year comparisons of performance that will become required in 2024 for the 2023 and 2024 reporting years.

It is also important to keep in mind that EU rules will likely become a requirement in the not-too-distant future to validate this reported data under CSRD- the new Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive and the European Sustainability Reporting Standards (ESRS).

GRESB's SFDR solution

GRESB offers an Assessment that provides Financial Market Participants with the framework they need for their Principal Adverse Impact Statement. The Assessment is comprised of around 60 ESG metrics that need to be reported on. It addresses the three tables related to Principal Adverse Impacts, covering Article 7 disclosure requirements for Article 8 and 9 products and funds.

SFDR - Infrastructure Assessments

The SFDR - Infrastructure Asset and Fund Assessments are GRESB’s Infrastructure solution for the Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (SFDR) and reporting on the Principle Adverse Impacts (PAIs). The assessment is based on the 6.4.2022 version of SFDR and provides financial market participants with a means to collect infrastructure asset data so that it can then be aggregated for funds or financial market participants ahead of their expected disclosure requirements in 2023. The methodology is consistent across different regions, investment vehicles and infrastructure sectors and aligns with Annex 1 template principle adverse sustainability impacts statement.

The Infrastructure SFDR Assessment was adapted to provide a standardized and user-friendly way for infrastructure participants to report their sustainability data in a secure platform and help them meet their disclosure requirements. Assessment participants get a head start on disclosure requirements by receiving:

GRESB Infrastructure Assessments

The GRESB Infrastructure Assessments are ESG engagement and benchmarking tools for institutional investors, fund managers, infrastructure companies and asset operators working in the infrastructure space.

There are two complimentary GRESB Infrastructure Assessments: a Fund Assessment and an Asset Assessment. Both address critical aspects of ESG performance through a globally applicable and standardized reporting and benchmarking framework. The Fund Assessment is intended for infrastructure funds and portfolios of assets, while the Asset Assessment is meant to be completed by the individual underlying assets (portfolio companies). Both Assessments cover the full breadth of infrastructure sectors, including:

The GRESB Infrastructure Assessment provides investors with actionable information and tools to monitor and manage the ESG risks and opportunities of their investments, and to prepare for increasingly rigorous ESG obligations. In turn, GRESB Infrastructure Assessment participants receive comparative business intelligence on where they stand against their peers, a roadmap with actions they can take to improve their ESG performance and a communication platform to engage with investors.

GRESB provides a free online training platform for all GRESB assessment participants. The training courses are modular and self-paced, walking participants through the various aspects of the Assessments,and providing detailed examples and tips for a successful submission.

Who can use the SFDR Infrastructure Assessment

The SFDR Infrastructure Assessment is available as a standalone assessment, to anyone that wants to use it to meet their disclosure requirements.

If you do not have a GRESB account, you can create one here.

If you already have a GRESB account, you can simply proceed with the SFDR Assessment by selecting this newly available option in the assessment portal. You will also be able to easily transfer information from the Real Estate asset portal to your SFDR Assessment.

More questions on SFDR? Check our FAQ

SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment Structure

Timeline & Process

The 2022 SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment opens in November 2022 and will close at the end of 2022. The reference period is calendar year 2021. Managers can use this assessment to prepare for their product- and entity-level mandatory reporting due in June 2023, using 2022 data.

GRESB will launch the 2023 SFDR Assessment early 2023, to be used for the mandatory reporting, using 2022 data.

Guidance & Support

The Assessment Portal includes indicator-specific guidance, available under the “Guidance” buttons that explains:

In addition to the guidance in the Portal, each Assessment is accompanied by a Reference Guide (this guide). The Reference Guide provides introductory information on the Assessments and a report-format version of the indicator-by-indicator guidance that is available under the Guidance tabs in the Portal.

Moreover, there are several tools and functionalities in the Portal to support submissions. For example, the Portal has real‑time error detection systems and warnings. More detail can be found in Participant Tools

GRESB works with a select group of Partners who can help participants with their GRESB Infrastructure Assessment submission. To learn more about the services offered by GRESB Partners, take a look at our Partner Directory.

Participants are able to contact the GRESB Helpdesk at any time for support and guidance.

Access to Data

Data is submitted to GRESB through a secure online platform and can only be seen by current GRESB Staff. No other third parties will see individual entity data.

Access to Assessment results

Data collected through the SFDR Infrastructure Assessments is only disclosed to the participants themselves in 2022. GRESB Investor Members will not be able to request access to SFDR reports in 2022, noting that this could change in 2023.

Participants can share data with their investors themselves outside of the GRESB portal by downloading their report as a PDF.

GDPR compliance

GRESB is fully compliant with GDPR. The GRESB Privacy Statement can be found here. GRESB also has specific internal policies related to GDPR, such as a Data Breach Policy and Data Protection Policy, that cannot be shared externally for security reasons. Note that asset level data does not fall under the incidence of GDPR because it does not contain any personal information.

Cybersecurity

GRESB’s data security measures and systems have been reviewed by an external expert and no issues were flagged. The GRESB website and the GRESB Portal are fully HTTPS/TLS encrypted. GRESB has strict and extensive policies on data security that cannot be shared externally for security reasons.

Language

All Assessment responses must be submitted in English.

Translation of the GRESB Assessment

The GRESB assessment portal can be translated by using “Google translate” via the Google Chrome web browser. This applies to the assessment portal, guidance notes and online version of the Reference Guide.

How to use Google Translate

  1. On your computer, open Chrome.
  2. Go to the web page you wish to translate in another language.
  3. At the top, click the Translate icon.”
  4. Chrome will translate the web page this one time.

Turn translation on

You can control whether Chrome will offer to translate web pages.

  1. On your computer, open Chrome.
  2. At the top-right, click ⠇ >Settings.
  3. At the bottom, click Advanced.
  4. Under 'Languages', click Language.
  5. Tick or untick 'Offer to translate pages that aren't in a language you read'.

If the page is not yet being translated to your language, click on the Translate icon again, select “options”, and make sure your “Translation language” is not set to something else. If it is, change it to the desired language for translation.

This works for the entire GRESB portal.

Disclaimer: Note that not all text may be translated accurately or be translated at all. GRESB is not responsible for incorrect or inaccurate translations. GRESB will not be held responsible for any damage or issues that may result from using Google Translate.

Guide to the 2022 Infrastructure SFDR Asset Assessment

This section provides specific guidance for the 2022 GRESB SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment (referred to as the “Assessment”).

This guide should provide all the basic information needed to complete the 2022 Assessment. Contact the GRESB Helpdesk for any additional support and guidance.

Important: Note that the European Commission has not provided any industry specific guidelines on how financial market participants should report on the Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (SFDR) and the Principle Adverse Impact Statements (PAIs). The guidance below is therefore based on that of the GRESB Infrastructure Asset Assessment.

Asset Assessment Participation

Precisely what constitutes an infrastructure asset is typically defined by investors at the investable entity level. These assets (investable entities) may comprise of single or multiple facilities. Either type of asset may participate in the Asset Assessment; however, reporting as a single facility provides the best basis for benchmark comparisons and is therefore recommended. Different approaches to participation are explained in the following sections. Note that these are only illustrative and that other scenarios are possible.

Single-facility assets

Single‑facility assets undertake their activities at one facility or across one facility network. These entities may be large and complex, or small and narrowly focused. The full description of the facility and business activities should be expressed in the Entity & Reporting Characteristics section of the Asset Assessment.

Examples of single‑facility assets include:

Multi-facility assets

In some cases, the asset’s activities may be spread across a number of facilities ‑ GRESB considers this to be a multi‑facility asset. A multi‑facility asset has the option to report:

  1. separately for each facility using multiple Asset Assessments, or;
  2. as a group using a single Asset Assessment.

Completing multiple assessments allows comparisons between assets and is strongly encouraged, whilst a single assessment may take less time if the relevant data is more readily available at the aggregated asset level.

Examples of multi‑facility assets include:

If a participant elects to report on multiple facilities in a single asset assessment, then it is strongly recommended that this aggregation be kept at a single sector and country combination, otherwise peer group comparisons are likely to be far less specific and useful. For example, a multi-facility asset that consists of on-shore wind farms in the UK can be compared to other UK wind farms, whereas an asset with wind and solar farms in various European countries will likely fall into a peer group of renewable energy in Europe which is far less useful for comparisons. Multi‑facility assets that participate as one entity should have centralized management and aggregated performance data. See “Sector and Geography” (RC3) in the Entity and Reporting Characteristics Aspect for more details.

Assessment Structure

The SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment consists of a number of aspects that a participant is required to report on, including:

*Note that the term table is used as a reference point to the mandatory and optional indicators as per the template provided by the E.U but that the SFDR assessment portal itself is not composed of ‘’tables’’. The SFDR report will however be in table format.

The SFDR Assessment is broken into three parts to reflect the different tables of PAIs as outlined by the EU documentation. These three tables are detailed as follows.

Table 1: Mandatory climate and other environment-related indicators, Social and employee, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and anti-bribery matters.

Table 1 focuses on environmental and social indicators applicable to investments in investee companies that have to be disclosed by financial market participants, these are considered as part of the mandatory indicators that have to be reported on.

Table 1 consists of 14 indicators across 5 aspects:

Table 2: Additional climate and other environment-related indicators.

These are considered to be optional although participants are encouraged to report on at least one of those indicators so financial market participants can abide by regulatory requirements.

Table 2 consists of 16 indicators across 4 aspects:

Table 3: Additional indicators for social and employee, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and anti-bribery matters.

These are considered to be optional although participants are encouraged to report on at least one of those indicators so financial market participants can abide by regulatory requirements.

Table 3 consists of 17 indicators across 3 aspects:

Participant Tools

Indicator Structure

Every indicator has a short title (e.g. “ESG Specific Objectives”) and a code (e.g. RC3) or a full reference (e.g. Indicator 1). These are followed by an initial indicator question that can be answered with ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.

When selecting ‘Yes’, participants are required to provide further information by selecting one or more answer options and/or completing an open text box or table. Participants should select all answer options that accurately describe the entity and or its activities.

When selecting ‘No’, participants may not select any additional sub‑options.

Reporting Year

Answers throughout the Assessment must be applicable to the reporting year identified in “Reporting year” (EC4) in the Entity and Reporting Characteristics, unless the indicator specifies an alternative reporting period.

GRESB recommends the use of calendar year over fiscal year for SFDR as per the reference period communicated in the regulation.

In the case you have both financial and calendar year reporting requirements and are unsure on how to proceed, contact us at gresb.com/contact for further information.

Reporting Entity

Responses should relate specifically to the “reporting entity” (i.e. the Asset) for which the Assessment is submitted.

The Entity may include the physical asset itself, the asset manager, the asset operator and/or the asset maintainer. Responses may relate to any organization involved with the asset and the service it provides, for example the asset owner, asset maintainer or asset operator.

Certain indicators refer to different reporting levels (e.g. Group, Operator, Contractor) that should be addressed within the indicator response and supporting evidence.

In the example in the figure below, the Reporting Entity (Asset) is Big City Airport. This Asset is part of Infrastructure Fund IV which is managed by Fund Manager LLC. Information pertinent to the Asset Assessment for Big City Airport may come from Big City Airport Management Ltd, Operations Contractor or Maintenance Contractor. In some cases, Fund Manager LLC may also provide relevant information for the Assessment. The airline, El Cheapo Air, is outside of the reporting entity boundary and so information relating to El Cheapo Air would not typically be relevant to the Assessment.

Aggregation Methodology

SFDR is a regulation that applies to Financial Market Participants who will have to disclose at either fund or entity level the aggregate environmental and social impact of their underlying investments.

In the case of infrastructure, this means that the tangible impacts have to be reported by infrastructure assets meaning they will be responsible in large majority in reporting and sharing this data with their investors, the role of financial market participants subject to the regulation on our platform will therefore be for them to encourage participation of the underlying asset investments in our SFDR solution and to then connect to these assets in our portal with the necessary financial information to obtain an aggregate impact report.

The aggregation of data follows the calculation methods provided in Annex 1 of the Regulatory Technical Standards pertaining to the PAIs principle adverse impact statements.

Aggregation is completed by an automatic system.

GRESB’s aggregation methodology will only be applicable at a fund level report, although fund of funds and financial market participants (FMPs) could theoretically connect to any of their underlying asset investments reporting on our platform. Like any methodology, where data gaps exist or coverage is limited, data download should help participants who wish to undertake the aggregation themselves.

Aggregation at the fund level is dependent on the following:

Once all assets of the fund have been connected and submitted, the fund is in-turn encouraged to submit.

Alignment with the GRESB Infrastructure Assessments

The SFDR Assessment was designed as a standalone assessment for both existing and new participants. In the scenario where participants are interested in reporting under both GRESB and SFDR, the following features were developed to reduce reporting burden.

Please note, if you have participated in GRESB in the past, there is no need to create new entities in the portal for SFDR if these are the same asset/portfolio/company/fund.

Fund Asset Links: The summary of entity assets of fund participants and their connection to the GRESB assessment will be maintained as there should be no portfolio distinctions between assessments. Please note, that different fields apply for SFDR and GRESB and that these should be filled.

Important: connections are common across assessments, these should be reviewed carefully.

Entity & Reporting Characteristics

Intent and Overview

Information provided in the Entity and Reporting Characteristics consists of two parts:

Entity characteristics: Identifies the reporting entity's characteristics that remain constant across different reporting periods (year-on-year).

Reporting characteristics: Describe the entity, define the reporting scope for the current reporting year and determines the structure of the Assessment submission.

Note that none of the indicators in the Entity & Reporting Characteristics is scored.

Entity Characteristics

Intent

Identify the participating entity. The entity name will be used to identify the entity on the GRESB portal and will be displayed on the entity’s SFDR Report.

Requirements

Complete all applicable fields.

*Values in the Entity Characteristics (EC) aspect are fixed to one entity, regardless of assessment year. In order to update these please select the 'Manage Entity' setting in the 'Assessment Portal'.

Terminology

Entity name: Name of the asset for which the Assessment is submitted. For example ‘Big City Airport’.

Organization name: Name of the organization that manages the asset. For example ‘Big City Airport Management Limited’ or ‘Big Global Asset Manager LLC’.

Intent

Describe the ownership status of the participating entity.

Requirements

Ownership: Select the nature of ownership of the participating entity. The nature of ownership aligns with the EDHECinfra™ TICCS™ classification for “Business Risk”.

Other: ‘Other’ answers must be outside the options listed in the indicator to be valid.

*Values in the Entity Characteristics (EC) aspect are fixed to one entity, regardless of assessment year. In order to update these please select the 'Manage Entity' setting in the 'Assessment Portal').

Terminology

Government entity: An entity owned and managed by the government.

ISIN: International Securities Identification Number. ISINs are assigned to securities to facilitate unambiguous clearing and settlement procedures. They are composed of a 12-digit alphanumeric code and act to unify different ticker symbols, which can vary by exchange and currency for the same security. In the United States, ISINs are extended versions of 9-character CUSIP codes.

Legal Entity Identifier (LEI): The Legal Entity Identifier (LEI) is a unique global identifier for legal entities participating in financial transactions. Also known as an LEI code or LEI number, its purpose is to help identify entities on a global accessible database.

Non-profit entity: An organization that uses its earnings and/or donations to pursue the organization's objectives. Usually these organizations are listed as charities or other public service organizations.

Non-profit entity: An organization that uses its earnings and/or donations to pursue the organization's objectives. Usually these organizations are listed as charities or other public service organizations.

Private entity: An entity that is not publicly listed or traded on a recognized stock exchange.

Public entity: A company that is publicly listed and traded on a recognized stock exchange such as Nasdaq or NYSE.

Public-Private Partnership (PPP) : A company that is publicly listed and traded on a recognized stock exchange such as Nasdaq or NYSE.

References

s "EDHECInfra - The Infrastructure Company Classification Standard (TICCS™), 2020 " "World Bank Group - Public-Private Partnership in Infrastructure Resource Centre "

Intent

Establish the age of the entity.

Requirements

Operation commencement: State the year when the entity first commenced, or is expected to commence, operation.

If the reporting entity represents a single facility, then the year entered should be when that facility commenced operation. If the reporting entity represents a portfolio of facilities being assessed as one asset (i.e. multi-facility asset) then it should be when the first facility in the portfolio commenced operation.

If the entity is still under construction (sometimes known as a greenfield asset), the expected year that operations will commence should be given.

If the entity is both in construction and operational, then enter the year in which the first part of the project commenced operations.

*Values in the Entity Characteristics (EC) aspect are fixed to one entity, regardless of assessment year. In order to update these please select the 'Manage Entity' setting in the 'Assessment Portal').

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to set the entity’s annual reporting year. This information is used in combination with the responses to the indicators Sector & Geography (RC3) to understand the entity’s reporting boundary.

Requirements

Select the reporting year approach that applies to the entity.

Important: Please note that SFDR has a reference period that relates to calendar year reporting. In case you have both financial and calendar year reporting requirements and are unsure how to proceed, contact us at for further information.

*Values in the Entity Characteristics (EC) aspect are fixed to one entity, regardless of assessment year. In order to update these please select the 'Manage Entity' setting in the 'Assessment Portal').

Terminology

Calendar year: January 1 – December 31.

Fiscal year: The period used for annual financial statements. Depending on the jurisdiction the fiscal year can start on April 1, July 1, October 1, etc.

Reporting year: Responses provided throughout the entire Assessment must refer to the reporting year identified in this indicator and should correspond to the most recently closed calendar year / fiscal year, as applicable. A response to an indicator must be true at the close of the reporting year; however, the response does not need to have been true for the entire reporting year

Reporting Characteristics

Intent

To align with SFDR requirements, the reporting currency is set to Euros.

Requirements

The currency used by the entity for Assessment indicators that require a monetary value as a response should be in Euros.

Where Euros is not the local currency of the entity, a conversion to Euros is expected.

Intent

Establish the economic size and number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) workers of the entity. GAV and revenue information are used (as denominators) to calculate intensity performance metrics in the Performance Component.

Requirements

GAV and revenue: Provide the entity’s GAV and revenue, both in millions (e.g. $75,000,000 must be reported as 75). GAV should be provided as at the end of the reporting year, and should include development and construction projects (if any). Revenue should be for the reporting year as stated in EC4.

It is mandatory to provide both the GAV and revenue. Estimates are acceptable (for example, annual operating costs may be used instead of revenue). Like all information provided to GRESB, this information will be kept confidential and is only shared with investors to whom you have granted permission. The information provided will be used to calculate intensities for certain indicators in the Performance Component.

Do not include a currency, as this has been reported in indicator RC1 above, but make sure the currency applied is consistent with indicator RC1.

Terminology

Contractor: Someone working for a business contracted by the asset to perform a service or other works at or for the asset.

Employee: Someone who works directly for the asset and receives compensation in the form of an hourly wage or annual salary for their work. This can be both onsite or offsite (such as in an administration office). Employers typically have to pay specific benefits such as contributions to pensions or taxes for employees. Employees may be either full time or part time and may operate on a short term contract.

FTE: Full Time Equivalent, a unit to measure the number of employed persons to make them comparable regardless of the number of working hours. FTE can be calculated by comparing the number of hours worked by an employee against the average number of hours of a full time worker. For example, if the number of hours worked by an employee in a week is 20, and the standard full time work week consists of 40 hours, the employee is counted as 0.5 FTE.

Gross asset value (GAV): The gross infrastructure value owned by the entity being the enterprise value associated with the infrastructure asset. Use of the 'tangible fixed assets' or 'property, plant and equipment' value may be a suitable estimate if enterprise value is not known.

Revenue: The annual income generated by the entity in exchange for providing the asset service.

Worker: Someone who is either an employee or a contractor, that is, workers include both employees and contractors, and the number of workers is the sum of employees plus contractors.

References

https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Glossary:Full-time_equivalent_(FTE) https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/understanding-employee-vs-contractor-designation https://business.gov.au/People/Contractors/Employee-or-contractor

Intent

Describe the sectors and locations of the facility or facilities that comprise the asset. This information is used for materiality-based scoring and to determine peers for benchmarking and reporting purposes. It is also used in combination with Reporting Year (EC4) to describe the entity’s reporting boundary.

Requirements

List all significant facilities that comprise the asset and complete details for each as follows:

  • Weight GAV: Assign a weight to each facility based on the actual or estimated proportion to the total asset GAV. The total weights of facilities must sum to 100%.
  • Country: Select from the list of countries (aligned to the UN Standard Country or Area Codes for Statistical Use).
  • Address: Enter the address of the facility including the number, street, town/city, and region/state. Suggestions will appear in a drop down menu, select the address that applies. Latitude and longitude coordinates will be automatically pre-filled if the address is valid. If the typed address is not found, provide an approximate location (e.g: street name) or enter the latitude and longitude coordinates in the next field.
  • Latitude and Longitude Coordinates: Enter the latitude and longitude of the facility in the relevant fields. The address coordinates will automatically pre-fill based on the address reported. Coordinates should be provided in decimal degrees.
  • Sector: Select the appropriate sector by selecting an option from the drop down list or entering by typing a keyword. Only list the facility’s core sector (its main infrastructure service). If there is more than one core sector for the facility,consider splitting it up into multiple facilities with one core sector per facility. The full list of sectors aligns to the EDHECInfra TICCS™ standard Industrial Classifications.
  • Lifecycle stage: select whether the facility is in operation or development.
  • Reporting boundaries: Select whether the facility is included in the entity’s reporting boundaries.

It is up to the participant to determine the best structure for reporting of facilities since they have the best understanding of their facilities. Multiple small facilities may be grouped into a facility network or similar, particularly if the core sector is the same for the grouped facilities. For example, a network of wastewater pipelines and pumping stations might be grouped into a single sewerage pipe network. Another grouped facility might be a group of rooftop solar installations within a certain region or country.

Note that the selected structure may affect your peer grouping based on the outcome of the primary sector and location.

Primary sector: The asset’s primary sector is determined by the facility table, based on the reported sector(s) of the Asset’s facilities. Assets are assigned a primary sector at the subclass, class or superclass level, according to the following logic:

  • Subclass: If 75% or more of the facilities belong to a single subclass, the Asset’s primary sector will be that subclass;
  • Class: If 75% or more of the facilities belong to a single class, the Asset’s primary sector will be that class;
  • Superclass: If 75% or more of the facilities belong to a single superclass, the Asset’s primary sector will be that superclass;
  • Diversified: If less than 75% of facilities fall into a single superclass, the Asset’s sector will be ‘Diversified’.

Primary Location: Similarly, the primary location is determined based on the location(s) of its facilities. Assets are assigned a primary location at the country, subregion, region or global level, according to the following logic:

Similarly, the primary location is determined based on the mix of facility locations, using a three-tier system as follows:

  • Country: If 59% or more of the facilities are located in a single country, the Asset’s primary location is that country;;
  • Subregion: If 59% or more of the facilities are located in a single subregion, the Asset’s primary location is that subregion;
  • Region: If 59% or more of the facilities are located in a single region, the Asset’s primary location is that region;
  • Global: If less than 59% of the Asset’s facilities are located in a single region, the Asset’s primary location will be listed as ‘Globally diversified’

Note: The country, subregion, region are defined using the UN country classification guidelines available here . The only Super-region used is Asia Pacific, comprising the combination of Asia (code 142 in the UN classification) and Oceania (code 142 in the UN classification).

This information will be used to identify peers from the same or similar sectors and locations. Additionally, the Asset’s primary sector and primary location determine materiality outcomes for certain ESG issues and scoring (see RC7 for more details).

Terminology

Facility: A site, structure or installation for engaging in an activity that provides infrastructure services.

Gross Asset Value (GAV): The gross infrastructure value owned by the entity being the 'tangible fixed assets' or 'property, plant and equipment' associated with the infrastructure asset.

GPS coordinates: Location based on the latitude and longitude in decimal degrees DD. eg: Latitude (“52.336424”) - Longitude (“4.884971”). Coordinates can be generated using GPS Coordinates.org

In development: The facility is under development and is not yet ‘in operation’. Typically ‘in development’ means the facility is in the planning, design or construction stages.

In operation: The facility is providing its core service (output) and has commenced earning revenue.

Sector: A group of specific industrial activities and types of physical assets and technologies.

References

EDHECInfra - The Infrastructure Company Classification Standards (TICCS™), 2020

UN - Standard Country or Area Codes for Statistical Use (M49)

Intent

Describe the ancillary activities engaged in by the entity. This information is used in combination with the Sector & Geography (RC3) and Reporting Year (EC4) descriptions to describe the entity’s reporting boundary.

Requirements

Significant activities: Select all significant activities engaged in by the entity, outside of its main activity. Insignificant activities typically make up less than 1% of the entity’s budget, resourcing or revenue, so excluding them from ESG reporting still provides a complete picture to stakeholders.

Activities in reporting boundaries: Select all of the ancillary activities that are included within the boundary of ESG reporting of the entity. This must be a sub-set (or all) of the activities listed in the previous section (in other words only select from the activities that were selected in the previous list).

  • Select all significant activities engaged in by the entity, outside of its main activity. Insignificant activities typically make up less than 1% of the entity’s budget, resourcing or revenue, so excluding them from ESG reporting still provides a complete picture to stakeholders.
  • Select all of the ancillary activities that are included within the boundary of ESG reporting of the entity. This must be a sub-set (or all) of the activities listed in the previous section (in other words only select from the activities that were selected in the previous list).

Terminology

Ancillary activity: The activities engaged in by the entity that allow it to provide its core service but are not its main activity.

Main activity: The activity engaged in by the entity that is associated with its sector and the core service that the entity provides.

Intent

Describe the structure and business risk of the participating entity.

Requirements

Structure: Select whether the entity’s structure is that of a Corporate, a Special Purpose Vehicle or some other structure (if so, then please describe).

Business Risk (Revenue basis): Select the most significant business risks (or revenue basis) borne by the entity being Merchant, Concessionary/Contracted, Regulated, or Other. More than one selection (i.e. a combination) is allowed. This aligns with the EDHECinfra™TICCS™ classification for Business Risk. Multiple answers are possible. For ‘Other’ answer, describe the business risk borne.

Scope of Service: Select whether the entity provides associated services in addition to providing the asset itself. The associated services may be Asset Maintenance and/or Asset Operation. This section then determines whether the Scope of Service provided by the entity is:

  • Asset provision
  • Asset provision and maintenance
  • Asset provision and operation
  • Asset provision, maintenance and operation.

This information is used for materiality-based scoring and to determine the entity’s peer group for benchmarking and reporting purposes.

Terminology

Asset maintenance: All actions necessary for retaining an asset as near as practicable to its original condition, but excluding rehabilitation or renewal. Maintenance does not increase the service potential of the asset or keep it in its original condition, it slows down deterioration and delays when rehabilitation or replacement is necessary.

Asset operation: The active process of utilizing an asset, which will consume resources such as manpower, energy, chemicals and materials.

Asset provision: The act of owning and making an asset physically available for operational and maintenance activities by the organization’s private parties or any other third-party (e.g contractors). Asset provision can also include design & construction, work typically done on Greenfield Assets. For classification purposes, Greenfield Asset developers should see themselves as Asset providers.

Concessionary/Contracted: A contracted infrastructure organization that enters into a long-term contract to presell all or most of its output at a pre-agreed price. All or the majority of market risk (price and/or demand) is transferred to a third party. The contract is for a significant period of the investment’s life, typically one or several decades.

Corporate: A corporate structure is that of a legal entity that is separate and distinct from its owners. Corporations have limited liability, which means that shareholders may take part in the profits through dividends and stock appreciation but are not personally liable for the company's debts.

Merchant: An organization that collects fees and tariffs from end users as a function of the effective demand for the provided service. The organization is mostly or fully exposed to market risks (price and demand risk).

Public Entity: A company that is publicly listed and traded on a recognized stock exchange such as Nasdaq or NYSE.

Regulated: An organization whose business is regulated by government agencies via limits on tariffs, rate of returns, or revenues. Also referred to as discretionary regulation.

Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV): A subsidiary entity with an asset/liability structure and legal status that makes its obligations secure.

References

EDHECInfra - The Infrastructure Company Classification Standards (TICCS™), 2020

IPWEA, International Infrastructure Management Manual, 2015

Intent

Provide a description and image of the entity that may be used for marketing and/or communication purposes.

Requirements

Description The description may include:

  • Purpose of the entity's operations;
  • The service(s) provided by the asset
  • Ownership and governance
  • Market position of the entity
  • Link to website

It is not necessary to re-state information that has already been provided, such as the entity's sector focus or location of operations.

Table 1: Climate and other environment-related indicators

Intent and Overview

Focuses on climate, environmental and social indicators applicable to investments in investee companies that have to be disclosed by financial market participants, these are considered as part of the mandatory principle adverse impact indicators that have to be reported on.

Important: It is important that entities select ‘Yes’ to all indicators they are able to report on, even if the indicator is not material or relevant to the entity and the figure reported is “0”. For example, in the case of renewable power, Scope 1 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions do not typically apply because the entity does not generate any Scope 1 emissions. In such a case, it is recommended for the entity to confirm they can report on GHG emissions and report ‘’0’’. Selecting ‘’No’’ should only apply if the entity cannot determine the true and accurate value and therefore cannot report on the metric at all.

Climate and Other environment-related indicators

2021 Indicator

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s measurement of GHG emissions. GHG emissions are the primary driver of anthropogenic climate change and a critical source of local, regional, and global environmental impacts. GHGs may result from the consumption or generation of energy, or from processes that produce GHGs directly, such as the production of cement. Evaluating direct and indirect GHG emissions (or Scope 1 and 2 emissions) has become the norm for organizations. Additionally, an increasing number of organizations are looking at emissions throughout their value chains (Scope 3 emissions).

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021): Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, estimations, assumptions used.

Calculated field: Total greenhouse gas emissions is calculated as the sum of reported scope 1,2 and 3 emissions. The calculated value will appear on the SFDR report of the entity.

Terminology

Greenhouse gas emissions: Total greenhouse gas emissions is calculated as the sum of reported scope 1,2 and 3 emissions. The calculated value will appear on the SFDR report of the entity.

Scope 1 carbon emissions: namely emissions generated from sources that are controlled by the company that issues the underlying assets;(EU)

Scope 2 carbon emissions: namely emissions from the consumption of purchased electricity, steam, or other sources of energy generated upstream from the company that issues the underlying assets;(EU)

Scope 3 carbon emissions: namely all indirect emissions that are not covered by points (i) and (ii) that occur in the value chain of the reporting company, including both upstream and downstream emissions, in particular for sectors with a high impact on climate change and its mitigation;(EU)

References

Annex III of Regulation (EU) 2016/1011;

(1) of Article 3 of Regulation (EU) 2018/842 of the European Parliament and of the Council (12)

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s carbon footprint.

Requirements

Scope 1, Scope 2, and Scope 3 GHG emissions reported in indicator 1 are used to calculate the entity’s carbon footprint.

Calculated field: The carbon footprint is calculated based on the total greenhouse gas emissions and GAV of the entity. The calculated value will appear on the SFDR report of the entity.

Terminology

Carbon footprint: total greenhouse gas emissions (Scope 1, 2 and 3) divided by the GAV of the asset.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s greenhouse gas intensity.

Requirements

Calculated field: The greenhouse gas intensity is calculated based on the total greenhouse gas emissions and revenue of the entity. The calculated value will appear on the SFDR report of the entity.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s exposure to the fossil fuel sector

Requirements

Select Yes or No

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Companies active in the fossil fuel sector: Means companies that derive any revenues from exploration, mining, extraction, production, processing, storage, refining or distribution, including transportation, storage and trade, of fossil fuels (EU).

Fossil fuel: Means non-renewable carbon-based energy sources such as solid fuels, natural gas and oil.

References

Article 2, point (62), of Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s share of non-renewable energy consumption and production.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021): Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Renewable energy sources: ‘energy from renewable sources’ or ‘renewable energy’ means energy from renewable non-fossil sources, namely wind, solar (solar thermal and solar photovoltaic) and geothermal energy, ambient energy, tide, wave and other ocean energy, hydropower, biomass, landfill gas, sewage treatment plant gas, and biogas; (EU).

Non-renewable energy sources: Means energy sources other than ‘energy from renewable sources’ (EU).

References

Article 2(1) of Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s energy consumption intensity per high-impact climate sector.

Requirements

The energy consumption intensity is calculated based on the total greenhouse gas emissions and revenue of the entity. The calculated value will appear on the SFDR report of the entity.

Terminology

Energy consumption intensity: Means the ratio of energy consumption per unit of activity, output or any other metric of the investee company to the total energy consumption of that investee company; (EU).

High impact climate sectors: sectors’ means the sectors listed in Sections A to H and Section L of Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 1893/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council (see reference section below) (EU).

References

Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 1893/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council

Biodiversity

2021 Indicator

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s negative impacts on biodiversity-sensitive areas.

Requirements

Select Yes or No

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Biodiversity: means the variability among living organisms arising from all sources including terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part and includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems;

Biodiversity-sensitive areas: Means Natura 2000 network of protected areas, UNESCO World Heritage sites and Key Biodiversity Areas (‘KBAs’), as well as other protected areas, as referred to

Protected area: means an area designated under the European Environment Agency’s Common Database on Designated Areas (CDDA); (EU).

References

Natura 2000

UNESCO World heritage sites

Key Biodiversity Areas (‘KBAs’)

Water

2021 Indicator

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s emissions to water.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021): Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Emissions to water: means direct emissions of priority substances as defined in Article 2(30) of Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and direct emissions of nitrates, phosphates and pesticides.

"Priority substances" means substances identified in accordance with Article 16(2) and listed in Annex X. Among these substances there are "priority hazardous substances" which means substances identified in accordance with Article 16(3) and (6) for which measures have to be taken in accordance with Article 16(1) and (8). (EU).

Non-renewable energy sources: means energy sources other than ‘energy from renewable sources’ (EU).

References

Article 2(30) of Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council

Waste

2021 Indicator

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s hazardous waste ratio.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021): Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Hazardous waste: Means hazardous waste as defined in Article 3(2) of Directive 2008/98/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council.

Radioactive waste: Means radioactive material in gaseous, liquid or solid form for which no further use is foreseen or considered by the Member State or by a legal or natural person whose decision is accepted by the Member State, and which is regulated as radioactive waste by a competent regulatory authority under the legislative and regulatory framework of the Member State; (EU).

Non-renewable energy sources: means energy sources other than ‘energy from renewable sources’ (EU).

References

Hazardous waste

Radioactive waste

Table 1: Indicators for social and employee, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and anti-bribery matters

Social and employee matters

2021 Indicator

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s violations of UNGC principles or OECD Guidelines for multinational enterprises.

Requirements

Select Yes or No

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

UNGC principles: means Principles 1 to 10 or the ‘Ten Principles’ of the United Nations Global Compact;

Human Rights

Principle 1: Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights; and

Principle 2: Make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.

Labour

Principle 3: Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining;

Principle 4: The elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour;

Principle 5: The effective abolition of child labour; and

Principle 6: The elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.

Environment

Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges;

Principle 8: Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and

Principle 9: Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Anti-Corruption

Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.

References

OECD DUE DILIGENCE GUIDANCE FOR RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS CONDUCT (2018)

OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (see p31)

UNGC principles

The UN Global Compact and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: Complementarity and Distinctions

UN Global Compact FAQ

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies and grievance/complaints handling mechanisms in compliance with UNGC principles and OECD guidelines for multinational enterprises.

Requirements

Select Yes or No

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Human rights policy: means a policy commitment approved at board level on human rights covering the economic activities of the investee company consistent with UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights; (EU)

References

OECD DUE DILIGENCE GUIDANCE FOR RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS CONDUCT (2018)

OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (see p31)

UNGC principles

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s average unadjusted gender pay gap.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Unadjusted gender pay gap: means the difference between average gross hourly earnings of male paid employees and of female paid employees as a percentage of average gross hourly earnings of male paid employees; (EU).

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s average ratio of female to male board members.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021): Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s exposure to controversial weapons..

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Table 2: Additional climate and other environment-related indicators

Intent and Overview

Focus on additional climate and other environment-related indicators, these are considered to be optional although participants are encouraged to report on at least one of those indicators so financial market participants can abide by regulatory requirements.

Additional climate and other environment-related indicators

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s emissions of inorganic pollutants. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Inorganic pollutants: means emissions within or lower than the emission levels associated with the best available techniques (BAT-AEL) ranges set out in the Best Available Techniques Reference Document (BREF) for the Large Volume Inorganic Chemicals- Solids and Others industry; (EU).

References

Best Available Techniques Reference Document (BREF) for the Large Volume Inorganic Chemicals- Solids

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s emissions of air pollutants. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Air pollutants: means direct sulphur dioxides (SOx/SO2) emissions, direct nitrogen oxides (NOx/NO2) emissions, , direct non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) emissions and direct particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions as defined in points (5) to (8) of Article 3 of, as well as direct ammonia (NH3) and direct total heavy metals (HM) emissions (encompassing cadmium, mercury and lead) as referred to in Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council (28); and

(5) ‘sulphur dioxide’ or ‘SO2’ means all sulphur compounds expressed as sulphur dioxide, including sulphur trioxide (SO3), sulphuric acid (H2SO4), and reduced sulphur compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S), mercaptans and dimethyl sulphides; (EU).

(6) ‘nitrogen oxides’ or ‘NOx’ means nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, expressed as nitrogen dioxide; (EU).

(7) ‘non-methane volatile organic compounds’ or ‘NMVOC’ means all organic compounds other than methane, that are capable of producing photochemical oxidants by reaction with nitrogen oxides in the presence of sunlight; (EU).

(8) ‘fine particulate matter’ or ‘PM2,5’ means particles with an aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 2,5 micrometres (μm); (EU).

means direct emissions of sulphur dioxides (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC), and fine particulate matter (PM2,5) as defined in Article 3, points (5) to (8), of Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council15, ammonia (NH3) as referred to in that Directive and heavy metals (HM) as referred to in Annex I to that Directive;

References

Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council

Heavy metals (HM) as referred to in Annex I to that Directive: Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s emissions of ozone depletion substances. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Ozone depletion substances: mean substances listed in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (29) (see reference below) (EU).

References

The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s emissions of ozone depletion substances. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not available yet.

References

References from the EU not available yet.

Energy performance

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s energy consumption by type of non-renewable energy sources. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

LPG, butane or propane: LPG stands for Liquefied petroleum gases. Both butane and propane are typically stored and/or transported in liquid form, classifying them as LPG. Mixtures of butane and propane in liquid form also fall under LPG (GRESB).

Motor gasoline: Liquid fossil fuel that is created from crude oil, also known as petrol. Includes forecourt gasoline blended with biofuels. Natural gas: Gaseous fossil fuel comprised mostly of methane. Can be compressed as CNG or liquified as LNG (GRESB).

References

References from the EU not available yet.

Water, waste and material

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity's water usage and recycling. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not available yet.

References

References from the EU not available yet.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies that address water management. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not available yet.

References

References from the EU not available yet.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of and scope water management policies in areas of high water stress. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Areas of high water stress: means regions where the percentage of total water withdrawn is high (40-80%) or extremely high (greater than 80%) in the World Resources Institute’s (WRI) Water Risk Atlas tool “Aqueduct”; (EU).

References

World Resources Institute’s (WRI) Water Risk Atlas tool “Aqueduct”

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of and scope water management policies in areas of high water stress. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Activities producing chemicals based on the NACE (Statistical classification of economic activities):

  • Agents involved in the sale of fuels, ores, metals and industrial chemicals
  • Manufacture of basic chemicals, fertilisers and nitrogen compounds, plastics and synthetic rubber in primary forms
  • Manufacture of chemicals and chemical products
  • Manufacture of other chemical products
  • Manufacture of other chemical products n.e.c.
  • Manufacture of other inorganic basic chemicals
  • Manufacture of other organic basic chemicals
  • Manufacture of pesticides and other agrochemical products
  • Mining of chemical and fertiliser minerals
  • Mining of chemical and fertiliser minerals
  • Wholesale of chemical products

References

Statistical classification of economic activities NACE Revision 2

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the entity’s involvement in activities which cause land degradation, desertification and soil sealing. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Soil degradation: Means the diminishing capacity of the soil to provide ecosystem goods and services as desired by its stakeholders, according to the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) as referred to in paragraph 100 of Decision No 1386/2013/EU;(EU).

References

Paragraph 100 of Decision No 1386/2013/EU

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies that address sustainable land/agriculture practices. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available

References

References from the EU not yet available

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies that address sustainable oceans/seas practices. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available

References

References from the EU not yet available

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies that address sustainable oceans/seas practices. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available

References

References from the EU not yet available

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies that address sustainable oceans/seas practices. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Biodiversity-sensitive areas: means Natura 2000 network of protected areas, UNESCO World Heritage sites and Key Biodiversity Areas (‘KBAs’), as well as other protected areas, as referred to in Appendix D of Annex II to Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/213912;(EU).

Threatened species: means endangered species, including flora and fauna, listed in the European Red List or the IUCN Red List, as referred to in Section 7 of Annex II to Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/2139;

References

European Red List or the IUCN Red List

Do no significant harm criteria of environmental objectivesAppendix D of Annex II to Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/213912.

Section 7 of Annex II to Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/2139.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of deforestation policies. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Deforestation: means the temporary or permanent human-induced conversion of forested land to non-forested land;

Threatened species: means endangered species, including flora and fauna, listed in the European Red List or the IUCN Red List, as referred to in Section 7 of Annex II to Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/2139;

References

‘Living well, within the limits of our planet’ Paragraph 100 of Decision No 1386/2013/EU.

Green securities

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the entity’s share of securities not issued under Union legislation on environmentally sustainable bonds. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not available yet.

References

European Green bond standard

Table 3: Additional indicators for social and employee, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and anti-bribery matters

Intent and Overview

Focus on additional indicators for social and employee, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and anti-bribery matters, these are considered to be optional although participants are encouraged to report on at least one of those indicators so financial market participants can abide by regulatory requirements.

Additional indicators for social and employee, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and anti-bribery matters

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of workplace accident prevention policies. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s accident rates. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s number of days lost to injuries, accidents, fatalities or illness. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of a supplier code of conduct. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies on the protection of whistleblowers. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s incidents of discrimination. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s CEO pay ratio. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Human rights

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of a human rights policy. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of a due diligence process to identify, prevent, mitigate and address adverse human rights impacts. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies against trafficking in human beings. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s exposure to child labour and hazardous work. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s exposure to operations and suppliers at risk of forced or compulsory labour. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the entity’s identified cases of severe human rights issues and incidents. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Anti-corruption and anti-bribery

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify the existence of policies on anti-corruption and anti-bribery consistent with the United Nations convention against corruption . This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to identify insufficient actions taken to address breaches of standards of anti-corruption and anti-bribery. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No:

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Intent

The intent of this indicator is to assess the number of convictions and amount of fines for violation of anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws. This indicator is considered to be optional for SFDR.

Requirements

Select Yes or No: If selecting “Yes”, the entity must be actively tracking and reporting on all of the mandatory reporting metrics.

Reporting-year performance (2021):Enter data for performance during the reporting year for each metric. ‘Zero’ is an acceptable answer if it is true and accurate.

Explanation (optional): Provide context to the answer that was provided, this helps investors gain an understanding of the methodologies, assumptions used.

Terminology

Terminology from the EU not yet available.

References

References from the EU not yet available.

Appendix 1 - Terminology

Source: Annex 1 SFDR

For the purposes of this Annex, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) ‘scope 1, 2 and 3 GHG emissions’ means the scope of greenhouse gas emissions referred to in points (1)(e)(i) to (iii) of Annex III to Regulation (EU) 2016/1011 of the European Parliament and of the Council1;

(2) ‘greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions’ means greenhouse gas emissions as defined in Article 3, point (1), of Regulation (EU) 2018/842 of the European Parliament and of the Council2;

(3) ‘weighted average’ means a ratio of the weight of the investment by the financial market participant in an investee company in relation to the enterprise value of the investee company;

(4) ‘enterprise value’ means the sum, at fiscal year-end, of the market capitalisation of ordinary shares, the market capitalisation of preferred shares, and the book value of total debt and non-controlling interests, without the deduction of cash or cash equivalents;

(5) ‘companies active in the fossil fuel sector’ means companies that derive any revenues from exploration, mining, extraction, production, processing, storage, refining or distribution, including transportation, storage and trade, of fossil fuels as defined in Article 2, point (62), of Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council3;

(6) ‘renewable energy sources’ means renewable non-fossil sources, namely wind, solar (solar thermal and solar photovoltaic) and geothermal energy, ambient energy, tide, wave and other ocean energy, hydropower, biomass, landfill gas, sewage treatment plant gas, and biogas;

(7) ‘non-renewable energy sources’ means energy sources other than those referred to in point 6;

(8) ‘energy consumption intensity’ means the ratio of energy consumption per unit of activity, output or any other metric of the investee company to the total energy consumption of that investee company;

(9) ‘high impact climate sectors’ means the sectors listed in Sections A to H and Section L of Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 1893/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council 4;

(10) ‘protected area’ means designated areas in the European Environment Agency’s Common Database on Designated Areas (CDDA0);

(11) ‘area of high biodiversity value outside protected areas’ means land with high biodiversity value as referred to in Article 7b(3) of Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council 5;

(12) ‘emissions to water’ means direct emissions of priority substances as defined in Article 2(30) of Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council6 and direct emissions of nitrates, phosphates and pesticides 6;

(13) ‘areas of high water stress’ means regions where the percentage of total water withdrawn is high (40-80%) or extremely high (greater than 80%) in the World Resources Institute’s (WRI) Water Risk Atlas tool “Aqueduct”;

(14) ‘hazardous waste and radioactive waste’ means hazardous waste and radioactive waste;

(15) ‘hazardous waste’ means hazardous waste as defined in Article 3(2) of Directive 2008/98/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council7;

(16) ‘radioactive waste’ means radioactive waste as defined in Article 3(7) of Council Directive 2011/70/Euratom8;

(17) ‘non-recycled waste’ means any waste not recycled within the meaning of ‘recycling’ in Article 3(17) of Directive 2008/98/EC;

(18) ‘activities negatively affecting biodiversity-sensitive areas’ means activities that are characterised by all of the following:

(a) those activities lead to the deterioration of natural habitats and the habitats of species and disturb the species for which a protected area has been designated;

(b) for those activities, none of the conclusions, mitigation measures or impact assessments adopted pursuant to any of the following Directives or national provisions or international standards that are equivalent to those Directives have been implemented:

(i) Directive 2009/147/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council 9;

(ii) Council Directive 92/43/EEC10 10;

(iii) an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as defined in Article 1(2), point (g), of Directive 2011/92/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council11 11;

(iv) for activities located in third countries, conclusions, mitigation measures or impact assessments adopted in accordance with national provisions or international standards that are equivalent to the Directives and impact assessments listed in points (i), (ii) and (iii);

(19) ‘biodiversity-sensitive areas’ means Natura 2000 network of protected areas, UNESCO World Heritage sites and Key Biodiversity Areas (‘KBAs’), as well as other protected areas, as referred to in Appendix D of Annex II to Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/213912 12;

(20) ‘threatened species’ means endangered species, including flora and fauna, listed in the European Red List or the IUCN Red List, as referred to in Section 7 of Annex II to Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/2139;

(21) ‘deforestation’ means the temporary or permanent human-induced conversion of forested land to non-forested land;

(22) ‘UN Global Compact principles’ means the ten Principles of the United Nations Global Compact;

(23) ‘unadjusted gender pay gap’ means the difference between average gross hourly earnings of male paid employees and of female paid employees as a percentage of average gross hourly earnings of male paid employees;

(24) ‘board’ means the administrative, management or supervisory body of a company;

(25) ‘human rights policy’ means a policy commitment approved at board level on human rights that the economic activities of the investee company shall be in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights;

(26) ‘whistleblower’ means ‘reporting person’ as defined in Article 5(7) of Directive (EU) 2019/1937 of the European Parliament and of the Council13;

(27) ‘inorganic pollutants’ means emissions within or lower than the emission levels associated with the best available techniques (BAT-AEL) as defined in Article 3, point (13) of Directive 2010/75/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council14, for the Large Volume Inorganic Chemicals- Solids and Others industry 14;

(28) ‘air pollutants’ means direct emissions of sulphur dioxides (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC), and fine particulate matter (PM2,5) as defined in Article 3, points (5) to (8), of Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council 15, ammonia (NH3) as referred to in that Directive and heavy metals (HM) as referred to in Annex I to that Directive ;

(29) ‘ozone depletion substances’ mean substances listed in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

1 Regulation (EU) 2016/1011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 June 2016 on indices used as benchmarks in financial instruments and financial contracts or to measure the performance of investment funds and amending Directives 2008/48/EC and 2014/17/EU and Regulation (EU) No 596/2014 (OJ L 171, 29.6.2016, p. 1).

2 Regulation (EU) 2018/842 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 on binding annual greenhouse gas emission reductions by Member States from 2021 to 2030 contributing to climate action to meet commitments under the Paris Agreement and amending Regulation (EU) No 525/2013 (OJ L 156, 19.6.2018, p. 26).

3 Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the Governance of the Energy Union and Climate Action, amending Regulations (EC) No 663/2009 and (EC) No 715/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Directives 94/22/EC, 98/70/EC, 2009/31/EC, 2009/73/EC, 2010/31/EU, 2012/27/EU and 2013/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council, Council Directives 2009/119/EC and (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 328, 21.12.2018, p. 1).

4Regulation (EC) No 1893/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006 establishing the statistical classification of economic activities NACE Revision 2 and amending Council Regulation (EEC) No 3037/90 as well as certain EC Regulations on specific statistical domains Text with EEA relevance (OJ L 393, 30.12.2006, p. 1–39).

5 Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 October 1998 relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels and amending Council Directive 93/12/EEC (OJ L 350, 28.12.1998, p. 58).

6 Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2000 establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy (OJ L 327, 22.12.2000, p. 1).

7 Directive 2008/98/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 November 2008 on waste and repealing certain Directives (OJ L 312, 22.11.2008, p. 3).

8 Council Directive 2011/70/Euratom of 19 July 2011 establishing a Community framework for the responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (OJ L 199, 2.8.2011, p. 48).

9 Directive 2009/147/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 November 2009 on the conservation of wild birds (OJ L 20, 26.1.2010, p. 7).

10 Council Directive 92/43/EEC of 21 May 1992 on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora (OJ L 206, 22.7.1992, p. 7).

11 Directive 2011/92/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 December 2011 on the assessment of the effects of certain public and private projects on the environment (OJ L 026, 28.1.2012, p. 1).

12 Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/2139 of 4 June 2021 supplementing Regulation (EU) 2020/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council by establishing the technical screening criteria for determining the conditions under which an economic activity qualifies as contributing substantially to climate change mitigation or climate change adaptation and for determining whether that economic activity causes no significant harm to any of the other environmental objectives (OJ L 442, 9.12.2021, p. 1).

13 Directive (EU) 2019/1937 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2019 on the protection of persons who report breaches of Union law (OJ L305, 26.11.2019, p. 17).

14 Directive 2010/75/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 on industrial emissions (integrated pollution prevention and control) (OJ L 334, 17.12.2010, p. 17).

15 Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 December 2016 on the reduction of national emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants,amending Directive 2003/35/EC and repealing Directive 2001/81/EC (Text with EEA relevance ), OJ L 344, 17.12.2016, p. 1–31

For the purposes of the formulas, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) ‘current value of investment’ means the value in EUR of the investment by the financial market participant in the investee company;

(2) ‘enterprise value’ means the sum, at fiscal year-end, of the market capitalisation of ordinary shares, the market capitalisation of preferred shares, and the book value of total debt and non-controlling interests, without the deduction of cash or cash equivalents;

(3) ‘current value of all investments’ means the value in EUR of all investments by the financial market participant;

(4) ‘nearly zero-energy building (NZEB)’, ‘primary energy demand (PED)’ and ‘energy performance certificate (EPC)’ shall have the meanings given to them in paragraphs 2, 5 and 12 of Article 2 of Directive 2010/31/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council 16

For the purposes of the Regulation:

‘financial market participant’ means:

(a) an insurance undertaking which makes available an insurance‐based investment product (IBIP);

(b) an investment firm which provides portfolio management;

(c) an institution for occupational retirement provision (IORP);

(d) a manufacturer of a pension product;

(e) an alternative investment fund manager (AIFM);

(f) a pan‐European personal pension product (PEPP) provider;

(g) a manager of a qualifying venture capital fund registered in accordance with Article 14 of Regulation (EU) No 345/2013;

(h) a manager of a qualifying social entrepreneurship fund registered in accordance with Article 15 of Regulation (EU) No 346/2013;

(i) a management company of an undertaking for collective investment in transferable securities (UCITS management company); or

(j) a credit institution which provides portfolio management;

16 Directive 2010/31/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 May 2010 on the energy performance of buildings (recast) (OJ L 153, 18.6.2010, p. 13).

Appendix 2: SFDR to GRESB Infrastructure Asset Assessment overlaps

Appendix 2: SFDR to GRESB Infrastructure Asset Assessment overlaps

A variable mapping helps existing and prospective GRESB participants understand the data overlaps between the GRESB Infrastructure Asset Assessment and the SFDR Infrastructure Asset Assessment. To view the document, please click here.